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22 August 2017
Framing the Discourse


Institutional Strategic Communications and Project Knowledge Transfer

As the importance of getting research into use becomes a crucial indicator of universities’ relevance and contribution to society and universities respond by strengthening research communication capacity, the capacity of executive directorates to lead on Strategic Communications (SC) to build the university’s brand and capacity to ‘translate’ academic research for use by lay audiences  - variously called Research Uptake Communication (RUC), Research Communication (RC), Knowledge Translation (KT) - can create tensions.

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Institutional Repositories and Open access: key tools for Research Uptake

Open access means unrestricted online access to peer-reviewed scholarly research. It encompasses not only open access journals but also hybrid journals that provide open access only to articles for which the authors (or more often their institution or funder) have paid an open access publishing fee. Authors can also arrange to archive a pre-version (after it has been accepted for publication but before it has been reviewed) or post-version of the article (after it has been reviewed but before it has been published) on their own websites, or the institutional repositories of their university.

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Part 4: Research Uptake Policy series: Towards synthesised theories of policy change – developing and establishing learning processes and frameworks

In the fourth and final blog of this “Research Uptake: Knowledge to Policy” blog series, Dr Sara Grobbelaar, DRUSSA  Researcher at CREST, explores why synthesizing models of policy change may be an important step towards developing a robust theory of policy change in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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Making Scholarly Research Visible

This blog discusses the final report of the Scholarly Communication in Africa Programme  (SCAP).

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Part 2: Research Uptake Policy series: a Meta-analysis of the knowledge-to-policy field

Dr Sara Grobbelaar, a Researcher at CREST,considers a range of authors’ views on the process for the analysis of the policy process and also reviews various paradigms of enquiry.

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Part I: Research Uptake Policy series – tensions between researchers, policy analysts and politicians

Dr Sara Grobbelaar, a Researcher at CREST, considers a range of authors’ views and explanations for the often troubled relationship between policy makers and researchers, and reviews a few suggestions on how to overcome some of these problems.

The first of this four-part blog series on Research to Policy begins by pulling focus on Research Uptake tensions, and considering the main stakeholders through a narrower lens. What is often at the root of many inter-relationship tensions? Differing perspectives and expectations.

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Making research make sense to users
Development means different things to different people. For some, development is understood as a simple and straightforward set of planned processes and outcomes, yet for others it is complex and arises from intricate responsive processes of human interaction. Whichever way development is understood, it can be argued that it should make sense to the people involved and affected.
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Research Uptake Policy Series
In this new series, I selectively review a number of concepts in the field of knowledge to policy. The topic has been defined from a range of angles, with various authors from wide-ranging disciplines and research traditions having studied the role of knowledge in the policymaking process. 
 
I have identified four areas that will serve as a framework within which to review some concepts in the knowledge-to-policy literature:
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Behind the University of Nairobi`s new open access policy

The University of Nairobi has adopted an open access policy to research articles and other academic material produced by its staff, and simultaneously launched an open access repository. The ACU and INASP collaborated to produce the article Enhancing the Visibility and Accessibility of Research: Demystifying and Promoting Open Access at the University of Nairobi in which Agatha Kabagu, Deputy University Librarian (Planning), University of Nairobi Library, details the reasoning behind the new policy and the steps taken to put it in place.

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Open access Part II: Driving new ways to measure impact

In Part I of his blog on Open Access, Jonathan Harle looked at open access and its implications for research uptake. Here, he takes the discourse further and looks at how open access drives developments in the ways the “impact” of research can be measured.

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Research uptake: The kid isn`t all that new on the block

Linda CilliersLinda CilliersWhat exactly is research uptake? A lot has been said and written about the concept, much of it by academics, and still it confounds people, even those whose everyday work is tied up with it. Late last year, we featured a series of blogs written by Jeff Knezovich about obstacles to research uptake, the first of which sets out what is meant when we talk about research uptake, explaining also how the concept has evolved over the years. The name may be relatively new,

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Open access Part I: What's in it for Research Uptake?

I spent a week in November at two valuable conferences on a critical issue for researchers across the globe -- open access. The two events were BioMed Central`s Open Access Africa, held at the University of Cape Town, and the Berlin10 open access conference, held at the University of Stellenbosch.

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The challenges of Research Uptake Part IV: Individual barriers

This is the fourth and final blog in the series on the challenges faced by practitioners of Research Uptake. In Part I we explored the concept of Research Uptake, in Part II, we examined challenges that exist at systemic level and in in Part III, we looked at institutional barriers to Research Uptake. This blog deals with individual barriers to Research Uptake. Please let us have your comments.

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The challenges of Research Uptake Part III: Institutional barriers

This is the third in a four-part blog series on the challenges faced by practitioners of Research Uptake. In Part I we explored the concept of Research Uptake and in Part II, we explored challenges that exist in the field at systemic level. In this third blog, we examine institutional barriers to Research Uptake.

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The challenges of Research Uptake Part II: Systemic barriers

This is the second in a four-part blog on the challenges faced by practitioners of Research Uptake. In Part I we explored the concept of Research Uptake and how the term had developed over the years. In this second part, we take a closer look at challenges that present themselves at systemic level in the field.

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The challenges of Research Uptake Part I: Systemic, institutional and individual barriers

This is the first in a four-part blog series on the challenges faced by practitioners of Research Uptake. The first blog looks at the concept of Research Uptake. Where did the term originate and how did it evolve?

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Defining Research Uptake Management (RUM)

Understanding Research Uptake: Research Uptake is a relatively new and emerging field in which the UK's Department for International Development (DFID) acts as a thought leader and advocate. DRUSSA has developed the concept of Research Uptake Management as a logical and necessary evolution. Working definitions are needed to bound the scope of the field in order to incorporate it as a practical, systematic management function in research institutions.

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Nelius Boshoff on Research Uptake Management

Research uptake is the process whereby research findings enter the domains of intended but also unintended audiences. It is a complex process as the audiences can be multiple (practitioners, policymakers, scholars, general public, etc.); the notion of “uptake”—which corresponds to “utilisation”—can assume different meanings (being aware of findings, quoting findings, implementing findings, etc.); and a variety of modes exist whereby research can reach user audiences (via publications, brokers, media campaigns, workshops, etc.).

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Diana Coates on Research Uptake Management

Research Uptake Management (RUM) is a process to systematically manage the research cycle from conception to utilisation with the purpose of getting research findings to the audience(s) for whom they are intended. It is usually research that is intended to have practical application while being underpinned by scientifically validated evidence.

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