Forgotten your password? 

21 October 2017
Research Uptake

Research uptake is the process whereby research findings enter the domains of intended but also unintended audiences. It is a complex process as the audiences can be multiple (practitioners, policymakers, scholars, general public, etc.); the notion of “uptake”—which corresponds to “utilisation”—can assume different meanings (being aware of findings, quoting findings, implementing findings, etc.); and a variety of modes exist whereby research can reach user audiences (via publications, brokers, media campaigns, workshops, etc.).


In addition, various factors need to be taken into consideration during research uptake, such as the values and norms of user audiences and their organisational interests and, of course, how the results should be tailored to best appeal to potential users. Research uptake management (RUM), therefore, is an equally complex process, given that it aims to facilitate research uptake amid all these challenges. For that reason the management of research uptake is often restricted to instances of planned research utilisation (i.e. tailoring specific research findings for specific audiences).



Improving Research Dissemination and Linkages between Research Institutions and Commerce and Industry

The theme of the 2014 WARIMA conference, held in Elizade, Nigeria from 24-26 November, was “Enhancing University-Government-Industry Research and Innovation Partnerships for local relevance and global competitiveness”. A round-table discussion featured the viewpoints of Federal ministries and agencies, the services and manufacturing industries, higher education bodies and WARIMA member universities.   The consensus was that, at present, it is the readiness of university graduates to participate in corporate and entrepreneurial jobs that can have the most impact.

Read more ...
 
Research Uptake Donor Review

DFID is one of several donors with a strategic commitment in research uptake and use. This donor review on research communication is part of a wider study contracted by DFID, which reviewed 17 DFID supported research communication programmes in relation to their contributions to DFID’s new research strategy. The objective of the donor review is to identify good practice, emerging lessons, and possible future directions in research communication, and to identify commonalities in donor priorities and strategies that could lead to better harmonisation and value addition.

Read more ...
 
Communicating Research for Utilisation Scoping Report (July 2010)

This small-scale study considered the potential of a complementary approach to existing research communication initiatives in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA); a meso-level strategy to build capacity inside the institution where the researcher is employed, and to establish research communication expertise as a core competency set. It examined whether central capacity could better support researchers, better utilise the externally-funded support given on a project by project basis, enable learning from multiple projects, and make the research outputs of universities more visible, accessible, useable, cost-effective and sustainable.

 
What is Research Uptake Management

Research uptake is the process whereby research findings enter the domains of intended but also unintended audiences. It is a complex process as the audiences can be multiple (practitioners, policymakers, scholars, general public, etc.); the notion of “uptake”—which corresponds to “utilisation”—can assume different meanings (being aware of findings, quoting findings, implementing findings, etc.); and a variety of modes exist whereby research can reach user audiences (via publications, brokers, media campaigns, workshops, etc.).

Read more ...
 
The University in Society: Engaging and Enabling

altaltby Liam Roberts

 

The famous adage asks us: If a tree falls in a forest and no one is there to hear it, does it make a sound? Perhaps we can adapt that question to fit a Higher Education context: If good research is generated and no one is there to manage it, does it have a development impact?

Granted, the second question isn’t as catchy. But it is the one with which we concern ourselves, and which forms the basis of much of our work in the DRUSSA programme.

Read more ...
 
The Science Cafe: An interactive approach to public engagement

altaltSuccessful Research Uptake depends on a whole range of engagement strategies on the part of the university. To bring research outputs outside the academic sector and into communities where they can have direct development impact, universities need to be able to work with mass media outlets to disseminate findings and to raise awareness about research activities.

Read more ...
 
Uptake of African University Research by Policy Makers

This blog outlines some key findings of a survey conducted by the Think Tank Initiative in 2013, which surveyed the key information sources that African policy makers use in the decision making process. DRUSSA Universities can use this information to refine their research uptake strategies to target policy makers with their research findings.

Read more ...
 
How can universities influence development policy?

altaltSome weeks ago, members of the Evidence-Based Policy in Development Network (EBPDN) had an interesting debate on what universities could do to get their academic research “out there”. Many good ideas emerged from the discussion. EBPDN coordinator at the Overseas Development Institute Clara Richards summarised the discussion, giving some examples and resources. This is the gist of the discussion.

Read more ...
 
Assessing research impact

One of the more significant debates surrounding the downstream results of Research Uptake concerns the complex task of assessing impact. On the one hand, universities will universally agree that a central part of their core mission is to serve the public good through the applied knowledge they generate for social and developmental change—and academics themselves are obviously also keen to see their own research inspire change and advance developmental goals. 

Read more ...
 
Social engagement: Seeking viable models
As we ask ourselves how we can build effective, sustainable Research Uptake systems at African universities, we should remind ourselves that similar questions are asked around the world. So, what lessons can be shared across borders, and what are the unique distinctions that differentiate effective Research Uptake systems elsewhere?
Read more ...